Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Translation service

Have you noticed the five links near the top of the page (below the blog title and above the first post)? Wonder what purpose they serve? Or were you brave enough to click on them to find out for yourself?

If you studied a foreign language in high school (or in your life after high school), you may want to try out these new tools. Click on the language of your choice (French, Spanish, German, Portuguese, or Italian) and Google will translate the entire blog page (but not the material in the column on the right) you're viewing into that language. The translations are quite good, but not perfect: I wouldn't use them to complete a homework assignment.

Google is also working on other language tools for translating entire web pages: Japanese, Korean, and Russian are currently in Beta. If you're interested in Greek, Dutch, or simple Chinese, try the web-based translation services offered by Babel Fish.

Another Photo from the 35th Reunion at the Argus

From left to right: Jane Wadsworth, NayDean Marble, Sybil Kowaczek, Mary Jo McCarthy


This one is one of many taken by Terry Burrows at the 35th reunion of the Madison Central High School Class of 1965, held at the Argus. Use the "35th reunion" label below to see other photos Terry took at that reunion.

Mary Jo McCarthy wrote to tell me Sybil died in 2005, shortly before the 40th reunion. However, Mary Jo has not been unable to find a printed/published obituary for Sybil. Neither have I have, although I did confirm Sybil's death date in the SSDI. Because I don't have an obituary for Sybil, I haven't added her name to the list of "classmate obituaries" shown on the right side of this page. If you have a copy of Sybil's obituary, please contact me so I can add it to our archives.

Tuesday, January 30, 2007

Puking in the parking lot and other memories of the Black Lemon + updates on Rusty's and the Bunny Hop


My previous post about Rusty's and the Bunny Hop elicited a flurry of comments, some from frequent commentators and one from WJE (Class of 1967), who may have been on the swim team and who drank beer at the Union before he was 18.

Marlene reported that "I Wanta Do It" is no longer on the jukebox at Rusty's. She also reports that, "There isn't much of anything on their jukebox. The bar is still the same horseshoe shape and they are still using the original old time cash registers. The dance floor has been long gone. Now there are pool tables and tables and chairs in its place."

Notice that I wrote "wanta" instead of "wanna." I made a quick trip to library to check out "Do You Hear That Beat," Gary E. Myers book about Wisconsin pop/rock bands in the 1950s and 1960s, and discovered the correct spelling of this well-known song. I also learned that , as Janet had already advised me in an e-mail, there were only three hoods. The band, according to Myers, was called Robin & the Three Hoods -- and sometimes Marrell's Marauders. Band members were Dave Reed, Jim Schwartz, Bob Bernhagen, Bruce Benson, and Mike Warner. Benson and Warner are both listed as drummers, so there must have been at least one personnel change during the band's history.

"I Wanta Do It" was recorded four times on two different labels (Fan Jr. and Hollywood). The B side was either "The Marauder" or "That's Tuff." If you have a copy, let me know. I'd love to hear it again (and so would lots of other people).

Nancy reminded us about the Black Lemon: "A straight shot out East Wash to Sun Prairie....151? Cars parked juxaposed, fake ID's and lotsa kids over served and found puking in the parking lot around 12:30-1:30 AM..."

Marlene didn't remember the Black Lemon, but Doug sure does:
"I can't believe that you never heard of the Black Lemon A-GO-GO, Marlene. That proves you're not an East Sider! It was just like Nancy described with the puking and all. For some reason, everybody got a little drunker there than at Rusty's. I got in there under age once and thought I was really getting away with something. The Black Lemon even sponsored a baseball team that some Central guys, e.g. Harold Ellington, played on in the summer leagues!"
Janet (in an e-mail, not a comment) remembers it too, but her memories are a bit tamer:
"I hung out at the Black Lemon A-Go-Go quite a bit. It wasn't any rougher than any other 18 year old beer bar. Terry Volk owned it. David Lulling (Charles David Lulling, Junior) was the manager. Marlene Romano was the DJ and every night she closed the evening of spinning records with Percy Sledge's "When a Man Loves a Woman." To this day, every time I hear the song I think of her."

"By the by, the building where the Black Lemon was is still there: A cheese market and store near the parking lot of Eastgate Theaters."
And let's let Janet have the final word: In yet another e-mail, she wrote that:
"The Bunny Hop was called the Bunny Hop because Jack Hare owned it. Hare. Bunny. Jack also owned Chesty's on State Street. Jack converted the Bunny Hop to a bowling alley when Class B/18 y.o/beer bars bit the dust. It may still be a bowling alley."
Notes about links: I've just excerpted some of the comments. Click HERE to read the full text. And if you can't remember what "When a Man Loves a Woman" sounds like, turn on your sound and click HERE. These links also appear in the post, but some of you seem to need very specific directions before you indulge in links.

Sunday, January 28, 2007

Revisiting State Street in 1966: The Case of the Missing Brathaus

Postcard of the original Brathaus courtesy of Ann Waidelich

A few weeks ago, one of my posts had a link to a list of businesses on State Street in 1966, compiled for Isthmus by Dave Medaris.

One astute Central alumnus, "WormDr MCHS-64," who, like Madison Guy, is apparently opting to remain anonymous, left the following comments:

Seems that the Brathaus at 603 State Street has been mysteriously left of the list. Wonder why.
The Brathaus was built in 1953 on the corner of State and Lake. It replaced the Log Cabin which was a block up State Street more or less across the street from where the Pub is now.

Recently, during one of my visits to the Downtown branch of the Madison Public Library (called the Central Library), I checked the 1966 city directory and discovered the Brathaus was not the only business on the 600 block of State Street omitted from that list. MacNeil & Moore (602 State Street) was also absent.

I also had a look at some of the folders in the library's vertical files and found a 1989 Milwaukee Journal article about the closing of the Brathaus, which I scanned. The scanned image, which includes a photgraph, is reproduced below. It will give you an idea about how much the building changed during its more than four decades on State Street.


I also found and scanned an article about 1977 the opening of the Brathaus Too at 10 W. Mifflin on the Square. According to the article, the Brathaus Too was located in the "old Chandler's Shoe Store building"). Like its older sibling, Brathaus Too has long been closed. The photo accompanying the article was just too tasty to ignore.


The didn't cut a ribbon when they opened Brathaus Too. Instead, Mayor Paul Soglin sliced through a ribbon of Bratwurst. Show in the photo, from left to right are: Sue Springman; Gary Jackson, owner of the Brathaus and Brathaus Too; Soglin; Carl Capicik, the restaurant manager, and Jim Tighe from Findorff Construction.

And for those of you who haven't been back to Madison for a long time, here's what the building looks like now (photo was taken in September 2005). State Street Brats still serves bratwurst, but it's a very different place from its much-beloved predecessor.




Reminder: Double click on any of the above images (scanned articles or photos) to enlarge them in your browser window.

Thursday, January 25, 2007

"Dirty dancing" in the Sixties: Remembering Rusty's, the Bunny Hop, and the Hokey Pokey



Since Doug Strand added a comment about the Rusty's and the Bunny Hop to the previous post, I'd thought I'd do a fast update on the situation during my morning coffee break.

Rusty's is still in business on University Avenue. I haven't been there in decades, so I can't report on whether or not they still have "I Wanna Do It" on the jukebox. I'm guessing at the correct spelling of the song title, so I'll also guess at the name of the group responsible for this titillating 1960s single: I think it was Robin and the Seven Hoods. I know where to find the authoritative answer to these questions, but don't have time today to drop everything and run to the library. In the meantime, feel free to leave a comment about this subject: You know you want to do it.

The Bunny Hop, in Middleton, to the best of my recollection, bit the dust decades ago. I'm also not certain of the spelling here. Was it a bit more cutesy? I think I was there only once, so I don't remember much about it, but I know there are Madison Central High School alumni who can contribute some insights by leaving comments. I also vaguely remember that lots of Madison East High School alumni hung out there, too.

Of course, very few people hung out at these bars while they were in high school. You did have to be 18 to drink beer and Champale way back then.

The Bunny Hop, of course, is also the name of a dance that was very popular when we were in grade school. I also remember doing it at the street dances held on Rusk Street by the Hawthorne Playground. While searching for a good link to information about the origins of the Bunny Hop, I discovered something truly amazing: The flip side (B side) of the "Bunny Hop" single was the "Hokey Pokey," another dance I remember from elementary school, but one that also showed up at high school events, offering those of us who weren't very good at rock 'n' roll an opportunity to get out on the dance floor and shake our backsides.

If you want to hear the "Bunny Hop" music and read some "refresher course" instruction on how to do the dance, click HERE. And if you just want to see some bunnies hop, click HERE -- and no, these are not Playboy bunnies, they're animated versions of the fuzzy kind.

Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Interpretive dancing class and other ways for Madison Central High School girls to earn an "M" in 1928


Let's stop looking at the Class of 1969 for a few days. Instead, click HERE to visit the Madison Central High School history blog and have a look at a post about the various ways Central girls could earn an athletic letter in 1928. Sports included basketball and baseball, but also included activities such as the interpretive dancing class shown in this photo from the 1928 Tychoberahn.

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

1965 Tychoberahn Senior Photos: Page 3 of 20




The senior photographs on this page are of John Bierman, Marlene Bjornethun, Tom Brew, Judy Bright, John Bruns, Gail Buchanan, Kathleen Buechner, Bill Buffo, Connie Burchette, Beverly Burmeister, Terry Burrows, and Carol Byers.

Double click on the image to enlarge it in your browser window. If you appear on this page of the Tychoberahn and you want to let us know what you've been up to lately, leave a comment or send an e-mail. And if something important was omitted from your list of activities, let us know about it, so we can correct the record here in cyberspace.

Use the labels to locate other posts that mention these twelve members of the Madison Central High School Class of 1965.

Notes: There are several spelling errors on this page of the Tychoberahn. Also, the reunion committee does not have a current address for Gail Buchanan or Connie Burchette. Please send me an e-mail if you know the current address for Gail or Connie.

Sunday, January 21, 2007

Update on a snowy afternoon in Madison


The library mall fountain (photo taken December 2, 2006)

It's cold and still snowing outside and I'm only somewhat less cranky than I have been lately. My cold symptoms ebb and flow, but haven't disappeared yet. My ability to concentrate and focus is limited -- and I need save my energy for an editing project that needs to be completed by tomorrow.

Nevertheless, I do occasionally take a break and tinker with the blogs. The large-scale, fact-filled posts will have to wait for a while, but I have managed to make some additions to the obituary archives. I've also made this annex to the Madison Central High School history blog a bit easier to search by adding labels that allow you to search by class year (the current range is 1911-1969). However, the largest label category is "class year needed." Take some time to use the labels to browse through the CHS obituary archives -- and if you can provide some information about graduation years, please leave a comment or send an e-mail.

And while we're on the subject of e-mail, let me acknowledge that I'm way behind in answering e-mails related to CHS -- and as for Christmas cards, if I finish attending to them by Valentine's Day, I'll be satisfied.

Once I feel better and start catching up with things, there are some interesting posts forthcoming. Jan Aulik, whose mother, Laurene Meyer, graduated from Central in 1934, sent me photocopies of the 1933 and 1934 yearbooks (at that time called The Orange and Black), and I plan to post some material from them. I'm also waiting for reunion photos from several classes. And, yes, I do plan to revisit the photo-a-day from January 3, 2007 and fill you in on all the interesting "Central connections," as well as reveal its location.

So stay tuned, check back frequently, and take a peak at the obituary archives. In the meantime, I'm drinking lots of liquids, taking Vitamin C, and trying to get some rest.

A photo-a-day: Number 7 - January 7, 2007 (belated posting)

Using the pumpkin catapult at the Treinen Farm near Lodi, Wisconsin (photo taken October 1, 2006 when I went to explore the Corn Maze)


The photo-a-day idea seemed like a lot of fun, but it rapidly became a lot of work. I couldn't maintain the pace I'd set and still have a life. So I took a break. I thought about abandoning the project altogether. Then I realized no one was forcing me to take a photo-a-day, write a lengthy post about it, and upload a whole flock of related photos on my Flickr account. Nope, it's my project and I can modify the rules.

The photos I post won't necessarily be ones I've taken the very day I post them. They may just be photos I think you might enjoy, accompanied by a brief caption. Every so often, I'll probably feel inspired or ambitious and revert to the original format.

A photo-a-day: Number 6 - January 6, 2007 (belated posting)


Two benches in the [sometimes] tranquil courtyard of Porta Bella at 425 N. Francis Street (photo taken June 13, 2006, shortly after I took the photos of the demolition of Paisan's on University Avenue)

The photo-a-day idea seemed like a lot of fun, but it rapidly became a lot of work. I couldn't maintain the pace I'd set and still have a life. So I took a break. I thought about abandoning the project altogether. Then I realized no one was forcing me to take a photo-a-day, write a lengthy post about it, and upload a whole flock of related photos on my Flickr account. Nope, it's my project and I can modify the rules.

The photos I post won't necessarily be ones I've taken the very day I post them. They may just be photos I think you might enjoy, accompanied by a brief caption. Every so often, I'll probably feel inspired or ambitious and revert to the original format.

Friday, January 19, 2007

Doug Moe makes another "Central connection" in his column (a lead item about Patrick McGilligan)

The Guardian is among the newspapers I read regularly, but I don't have time to read everything. So I missed a glowing review of a forthcoming book by Patrick McGilligan about pioneering black filmmaker Oscar Micheaux. McGilligan (photo on left) was president of the Class of 1969, the last class to graduate from Madison Central (which was then called Central-University High School). The review was published in The Guardian on November 24, 2006, the day after Thanksgiving.

Today, Doug Moe featured Dennis and his book as the lead item in his column in The Capital Times -- and he made the "Central connection."

Thursday, January 18, 2007

1965 Tychoberahn Senior Photos: Page 2 of 20




The senior photographs on this page are of Tom Baron, Michael Barr, Dale Beckett, Jeff Beld, David Beckett, Benjamin Beiler, JoAnn Benell, Sharon Bentley, Nancy Berg, Larry Bergmann, Vaughn Berry, and Suzanne Bible.

Double click on the image to enlarge it in your browser window. If you appear on this page of the Tychoberahn and you want to let us know what you've been up to lately, leave a comment or send an e-mail. And if something important was omitted from your list of activities, let us know about it, so we can correct the record here in cyberspace.

Use the labels to locate other posts that mention these twelve members of the Madison Central High School Class of 1965.

Notes: There are several spelling errors on this page of the Tychoberahn. Also, the reunion committee does not have a current address for Vaughn Berry. Please send me an e-mail if you know Vaughn's current address.

Tuesday, January 16, 2007

1965 Tychoberahn Senior Photos: Page 1 of 20




The senior photographs on this page are of Mark Aldridge, Marion Allen, Mike Allen, Steve Arnett, Brent Arnold, Kathy Arnold, Linda Austin, Sandy Ayres, Harold Bakken, Jim Bakken, Sharon Bambrough, and Linda Balser.

Double click on the image to enlarge it in your browser window. If you appear on this page of the Tychoberahn and you want to let us know what you've been up to lately, leave a comment or send an e-mail. And if something important was omitted from your list of activities, let us know about it, so we can correct the record here in cyberspace.

Use the labels to locate other posts that mention these twelve members of the Madison Central High School Class of 1965.

Sunday, January 14, 2007

We've moved to the New Blogger and started adding labels -- now it's back to bed

Just when it seemed as if my cold had vanished, some other nasty bug decided to bite. Very unpleasant symptoms. Very tired and cranky blogger who didn't feel very creative. Today, however, I decided to try something risky to alleviate my boredom: I switched the blogs to the New Blogger, even though I was worried about the possibility of everything (more than 1,200 posts total) vanishing during the move.

Except for some minor formatting problems, the move to the New Blogger seems to have gone well. In addition to a more stable system (so they say), the New Blogger offers labels. I've just started adding them, but since (hooray!) the New Blogger offers batch editing of posts, you'll find I've already added quite a few. And some other weekend when I'm sick, bored, and snowed in, I'll probably add more. Plus, I'll add them to new posts.

So why the excitement about labels? Well, if you click on a label, it will bring up all the posts with that same label. So, for instance, if you click on one of the labels at the end of this post, you'll find all the posts that mention Nancy Ellis, Larry Studesville, Doug Strand, or State Street. It's another tool for locating information that may interest you. Have fun. I'm going to rub some more Vicks on my chest and head back to bed.

Tuesday, January 09, 2007

2007 All-Central reunion: Usual place, usual time, usual suspects

Rich Bennett is not an easy man to reach. That's why I e-mailed Roger Boeker (Class of 1960) to ask him about plans for the 2007 All-Central reunion. Roger is the Post Commander for the VFW Post 1318 on Lakeside Street. Roger says the event is scheduled for the usual date (the Sunday before Valentine's Day).



What
: All Central Reunion
When: Sunday, February 11, 2007
Time: Noon until whenever
Where:
VFW Post 1318
133 E. Lakeside Street
Madison, Wisconsin 53715

Operating on the assumption that the time, as well as the place will be the same this year, I've updated last year's details to reflect what's happening a little more than four weeks from today.

If anyone sees Rich, tell him to telephone me to confirm the details. In the meantime, mark your calendars -- and plan to arrive early because that will maximize your opportunities to see and talk with your fellow Madison Central High School alumni.

Saturday, January 06, 2007

On hiatus

Started to write that it was a gray, gloomy morning, but just now the sun popped out from behind the clouds. Alas, while that may lift my spirits a bit, but I'm still suffering from an unpleasant, enervating cold. Taking a vacation from blogging to sip hot tea with lemon and honey and get some rest. Back to blogging when my energy and enthusiasm return.

Wednesday, January 03, 2007

A photo-a-day: Number 3 - January 3, 2007

If you look carefully, you should be able to discern the Wisconsin State Capitol in the distance.


Here's today's photo -- and that's about all that's on offer for a while. Right now, I have a looming deadline and a mild case of the chills that I hope is not a portent of a nasty cold.

Let's just call this one a mystery photo. In addition to the caption, here's what I'm willing to tell you about it:

One of 125 I photos took this afternoon, it will eventually be accompanied by a Flickr set of the best of the rest. The photos were taken at a place I've never before visited. And yes, there is a "Central connection."

Eventually, I'll return to this photo and its siblings because they are part of a very interesting story. For now, however, I'm turning up the heat and putting my nose to the grindstone.

Tuesday, January 02, 2007

A photo-a-day: Number 2 - January 2, 2007


A trail of tires paves the way for a piece of heavy equipment's journey from a construction site to a flatbed trailer that will transport it to its next job.


Why?


I was walking near Garner Park this afternoon when I sighted a piece of construction equipment sitting atop a hill not far from the intersection of Mineral Point Road and Whitney Way. From afar, it looked a bit like a gigantic, orange praying mantis. When I crossed the road and climbed the hill to take a closer look, I became fascinated by its perambulation across a parking lot.

A Central connection?

I can't think of one. However, Central alumni will remember when the area around Charmany Farm (just west of the intersection of Mineral Point Road and Whitney Way), now the location of the University Research Park, was way out in the country. Most will remember a time when Madison "ended" near what is now the site of the Hilldale shopping center.

Anything else?

The construction site was located behind the First Business Bank at 401 Charmany Drive. I asked Michael Bakken, operations manager of Northwestern Stone LLC (and the man in the cab, driving the machine across the tires) a few questions about what was happening. The bright orange machine, he said, was a hydraulic hammer. Another company is constructing a satellite dish pad on the site and they encountered some very hard limestone. They called in Northwestern Stone because it was necessary to have special equipment to chip out the rock.

I've posted a set of photos showing the process of moving the hydraulic hammer across the tires and onto the trailer in a set on my Flickr account. The set also features some views of the surrounding area from atop the hill.

Monday, January 01, 2007

A photo-a-day: Number 1 - January 1, 2007

404 Glenway Street, across from the Glenway Golf Course in Madison, Wisconsin


Why?


I parked my car nearby when I took a walk through Forest Hill Cemetery this afternoon. I wanted to try to capture the way the windows reflected an image of the golf course.

A Central connection?

Maybe. One of the occupants of the building is the Paskin & Oberwetter Law Office. There were several Paskins who attended Madison Central High School.

Anything else?

You can see some photos taken during my walk through Forest Hill Cemetery on my new Flickr account.

And as long as we're on the subject of links, let me mention one more

A few days ago, Skip at Up the Downstair e-mailed me to ask permission to use a couple of the photos from my recent post about the death of Otis Redding on his blog. Flattered that he'd read my post -- and very pleased that he asked permission -- I naturally said, "Yes."

You can download a podcast from his Otis Redding post, watch a video of an Otis Redding performance, or just read the text and admire the photos.

FYI: Learning how to work with Flickr and migrating to the New Blogger are going to keep me busy for many months. Don't expect to find podcasts here any time soon.

More links than you can shake a stick at

Links are a kind of currency in the world of blogging. The more people who link to your blog, the more popular you're deemed to be. For instance, fellow alumnus Madison Guy (whoever he is) is much more "popular" than I am because he has many more incoming links than I do. We've both done well in terms of links from the Isthmus Daily Page's Madison Miscellany, but he's done much better in the big wide world outside of Madison. This is probably because he writes about a wider range of subjects than I do, but it may also involve a bit of skulduggery or a savvy marketing plan.

There are, however, several important local links to this blog (and/or the Central History blog) that are, I believe, fairly prestigious because they confer institutional recognition of what I'm trying to achieve, particularly with regard to researching and preserving the history of Madison Central High School. So I'm going to begin the new year with a big of bragging.

The Madison Metropolitan School District includes a link to the Central History blog on the "About Each School" page of its web site. You'll find the link if you scroll down to near the bottom of the page. It's listed under "Other Facilities." This link has brought many visitors to the Central History blog. Until this link was added, there was nothing on the MMSD web site that acknowledged the existence of Central.

The Post section of madison.com, the web site for the Wisconsin State Journal and The Capital Times, lists both this blog and the Central History blog in its local blogs directory under "News and Current Events."

The "Madison Area History" page on the Madison Public Library's web site lists both this blog and the Central History blog under "School Spirit" (scroll about halfway down the page to find this section). Like the MMSD link, the library's link has brought many visitors to the blogs.

Some days I do long to possess more links than you can shake a stick at (and a way to rewrite this sentence so it doesn't end with a preposition). Perhaps I could spend my time trying to convince Central alumni to start blogs so we could link to one another and collectively boost our popularity, but these blogs aren't about popularity.

New toys for a new year

Most of the new toys I expect to be playing with in 2007 are not the kinds of things you find under your Christmas tree, wrapped in shiny paper. Instead, they're features I plan to learn how to use and add to my blog empire (this blog, the Central History blog, the obituaries archives, and a blog or two I haven't told you about yet).

The first to arrive on the scene is a Flickr account for my photographs. Look in the right hand column for the heading "My Photos on Flickr" and you'll see a small set of photos. Click on one of them and it will take you to the Flickr account for Central Historian (that's me), where you can view all of the photos I've uploaded. Flickr allows me to use tags and descriptions. Plus, if you have a Yahoo e-mail address, you should be able to log on and leave comments under the photos.

I'm still learning how to use all the tools available in Flickr, so bear with me. In the meantime, take a look and play around with some of the options for locating and viewing my photos. And then, if you've never taken a look at the huge number of photographs other people have posted on Flickr, do some exploring.

Eventually, my blogs will be transferring to the New Blogger (formerly known as Blogger Beta). Then, I'll be able to use tags on the post, making it easier for you to find things. For example, I can tag a posts with "football" or "cheerleader" or "Mr. Colucci" -- or whatever else I want. When you click on a tag, you will open a page that takes you to all the posts with that same tag. Nifty? Absolutely? Time-consuming to go back and make tags for all 450+ posts? You betcha! So don't expect this little toy to be available for several (or more) months.